• Discover Guided Tours of Brazil

    Sugar Loaf at Rio de Janeiro - BrazilDuring the vacations of a lot of people, they don’t ever think about to travel to South America. However, you can find many guided tours to visit the countries of South America, which may provide you with an adventure of a lifetime and will definitely allow you to see new places. In South America, the guided tour of Brazil may be the one of the best and adventurous tour for you.

    In Brazil a lot of guided tours start from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil’s greatest city. After obtaining a residence, your tour guide may start your tour with a spectacular two-stage cable car tour of the Mountain of Sugar Loaf. Towards the top of the particular hill, you’ll take mountaintop photos of Rio de Janeiro city, wonderful Guanabara Bay and the beautiful Beach of Copacabana.

    Whilst your stay in Rio, many led trips are going to take you to see the particular places with the metropolis, which include a visit of world’s factory and store of Gemstone and Jewelry known as L. Stern Gemstone Factory. You can even visit the Mountain called Corcovado, climbing the particular mountain using a cog railway. At the pinnacle, the site with the statue of Christ the Redeemer, sitting at a height of 2,300 ft above the town. From here you will have a 360 degree bird’s eye view of the city of Rio de Janeiro and its surroundings.

    While in Rio de Janeiro, many carefully well taken trips can familiarize you with traditional Brazilian delicacies, shopping locations, music spots and locations for further searching along with sightseeing all yourself.  (more…)

  • Brasilia – Federal Capital of Brazil

    Pontão do Lago Sul, Brasília

    Brasilia is actually the capital of Brazil. It is home to the major foreign embassies and headquarters of many of the major businesses in Brazil as well. It was finalized in 1960 as the capital of Brazil. It holds many beautiful architectural wonders to be seen and enjoyed.

    History and Legands

    The city was originally built in 1891 so that the capital could be moved from Rio de Janiero. This was to encourage migration westward in Brazil. Supposedly, Italian saint Don Bosco dreamed of a futuristic city in 1883 which fit the description of Brasila. He stated “between parallels 15 and 20, around a lake which shall be fored; great civilization will thrive and that will be the promisd land.” He is now remembered throughout the city.  (more…)

  • Brazil prepares for major tourism boost

    Christ the Redeemer - Statue in Rio de JaneiroSipping a very cold beer on Rio de Janeiro’s famous Copacabana beach, it is immediately obvious that Brazil has huge potential as a tourist destination. As the city’s young and beautiful strut their stuff under the azure sky, the sea in front of you, and mountains towering behind you, Rio is a picturesque spot. Add weather seemingly sent direct from heaven by Christ the Redeemer himself, who in statue form towers above the city, and Rio should be packed full of gringos (foreigners). Instead Brazil in general remains relatively untapped as a holiday destination.

    In 2010, the number of overseas visitors to the country totalled 5.2 million, according to the United Nations World Tourism Organisation. This meant that Brazil did not even feature in the global top 10, and it was dwarfed by world number one France, 76.8 million, and number two, the US, 60 million. There are numerous reasons why Brazil remains off the main holiday map, but perhaps the biggest two are the fact it is rather a long way from Europe and the US, and a perception of high crime levels. Flavio Dino, the president of Embratur, the Brazilian Tourist Board, told the BBC Business website that running a successful 2014 World Cup, and 2016 summer Olympics in Rio, will help to more than double the number of people visiting the country by 2020.  (more…)

  • Brazil Job Market Continues to Impress

    Brazil Job Market Continues to Impress

    Can Brazil’s record employment rate get any better? The Labor Ministry reported the creation of 280,799 last month. Beating the 209,425 posted last January. Before the numbers came out, the market was suggesting gains of 206,000.

    What do the numbers mean? Other than the fact that Brazil is still hiring like mad, it means demand is still there. And demand for goods and services means inflation, which is already 6%, its highest in around 8 years.

    Last week, the Labor Ministry reported that the country’s hiring frenzy is bringing in more workers from abroad. In 2010, Brazil companies hired 56,006 workers from other countries, up 30% from 2009.

    “The increase in these authorized workers since 2006 is because of increased foreign investments in Brazil,” says the Labor Minister’s General Coordinator for Immigrant Workers, Paulo Sergio Almeida. He cited hiring especially at industrial factories, and at oil and gas companies.

    In the industrial sector, the increase in workers is due to our own industrial park expansion, including modernization and implementation of new industrial segments. The acquisition of new equipment and technology from abroad demands that you bring in professionals specialized in supervising the building and execution of the most sensitive steps in the process of setting up this equipment in order for a decent transfer of technology to happen,” he says.

    Most of Brazil’s highest paid, high demand jobs are specialized.

    A quick look at where Brazil’s jobs will be in the next 10 years.  (more…)

  • Brazil poised to enter top five world economies

    Brazil poised to enter top five world economiesIt is one of the world’s fastest growing economies, and as the latest figures demonstrate, Brazil shows no signs of slowing down. While investment continued to flow into the country last year, the South American nation’s economy grew by 7.5%, its fastest pace in 24 years, putting its current GDP at $2.1 trillion.

    Brazilian Finance Minister Guido Mantega stated that further revision in World Bank and IMF figures was likely to push the country up two more spots. “If we consider prices and purchasing power, a pending homework from the World Bank and IMF, Brazil’s GDP is $3.6 trillion, which places us in fifth place ahead of France and the UK”, said Mantega.

    Growth in local agriculture and manufacturing industries played a large role in the increase, while overall investment in the nation increased by a huge 21.8%.

    The Brazilian government has acted promptly to cool inflation and growth rates, however, with the Central Bank having increased interest rates by half a per cent earlier this week. President Dilma Rousseff stated her administration would maintain “a reasonable, sustainable and standing growth rate” to ensure Brazil remained a stable choice for investors. “We’ll keep an eye on stability and another on investment”, she said.

    Sarah Kendell – http://www.themovechannel.com/news/7f05abce-7a8e/

  • Brazil’s president meets Prince Felipe of Spain

    Brazil's president meets Prince Felipe of SpainBrazil’s first-ever female president, Dilma Rousseff. who was voted in this weekend, has sent a message to Spain assuring the country of the importance of its investment in the Latin American nation.

    She spoke with Prince Felipe about commercial relations between the two countries in a meeting in the Brazil’s capital, Brasilia.

    During this, the first meeting with a foreign leader for Rousseff in her short history as Brazilian president, the heir to the Spanish throne handed her a letter from his father, King Juan Carlos, inviting her to visit Spain.

    They agreed that the presence of Spanish companies in Brazil was ‘positive for both countries’ and should be increased, taking advantage of the business opportunities presented by the World Cup football tournament in 2014 and Olympic games in 2016, both in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil’s largest city and former capital until Brasilia took on this status in 1960.

    They spoke about the possibilities of increasing military and defence cooperation; promoting Spanish language teaching in Brazil; Spain’s role in helping Brazil combat poverty, and job opportunities for Spanish people in Brazil.

    Prince Felipe had the chance to meet with various Spanish expatriates in Brazil before his return to Madrid.