• Brazil prepares for major tourism boost

    Christ the Redeemer - Statue in Rio de JaneiroSipping a very cold beer on Rio de Janeiro’s famous Copacabana beach, it is immediately obvious that Brazil has huge potential as a tourist destination. As the city’s young and beautiful strut their stuff under the azure sky, the sea in front of you, and mountains towering behind you, Rio is a picturesque spot. Add weather seemingly sent direct from heaven by Christ the Redeemer himself, who in statue form towers above the city, and Rio should be packed full of gringos (foreigners). Instead Brazil in general remains relatively untapped as a holiday destination.

    In 2010, the number of overseas visitors to the country totalled 5.2 million, according to the United Nations World Tourism Organisation. This meant that Brazil did not even feature in the global top 10, and it was dwarfed by world number one France, 76.8 million, and number two, the US, 60 million. There are numerous reasons why Brazil remains off the main holiday map, but perhaps the biggest two are the fact it is rather a long way from Europe and the US, and a perception of high crime levels. Flavio Dino, the president of Embratur, the Brazilian Tourist Board, told the BBC Business website that running a successful 2014 World Cup, and 2016 summer Olympics in Rio, will help to more than double the number of people visiting the country by 2020.  (more…)

  • Brazil Job Market Continues to Impress

    Brazil Job Market Continues to Impress

    Can Brazil’s record employment rate get any better? The Labor Ministry reported the creation of 280,799 last month. Beating the 209,425 posted last January. Before the numbers came out, the market was suggesting gains of 206,000.

    What do the numbers mean? Other than the fact that Brazil is still hiring like mad, it means demand is still there. And demand for goods and services means inflation, which is already 6%, its highest in around 8 years.

    Last week, the Labor Ministry reported that the country’s hiring frenzy is bringing in more workers from abroad. In 2010, Brazil companies hired 56,006 workers from other countries, up 30% from 2009.

    “The increase in these authorized workers since 2006 is because of increased foreign investments in Brazil,” says the Labor Minister’s General Coordinator for Immigrant Workers, Paulo Sergio Almeida. He cited hiring especially at industrial factories, and at oil and gas companies.

    In the industrial sector, the increase in workers is due to our own industrial park expansion, including modernization and implementation of new industrial segments. The acquisition of new equipment and technology from abroad demands that you bring in professionals specialized in supervising the building and execution of the most sensitive steps in the process of setting up this equipment in order for a decent transfer of technology to happen,” he says.

    Most of Brazil’s highest paid, high demand jobs are specialized.

    A quick look at where Brazil’s jobs will be in the next 10 years.  (more…)